A new month, and a new month’s recipes from the National Mark Calendar of Cooking; this useful little book, published in 1934, offers recipes to use the produce available throughout the seasons. Each month has a charming and often whimsical introduction written by Ambrose Heath and Dorothy Cottington Taylor, beneath an equally charming woodcut by Blair Hughes Stanton, followed by a list of the most commonly available fruit and vegetables, and then a selection of recipes.

July is the gardener’s month again; and salads are in greater demand than ever. Weekend cottages and picnics put a strain on the housewife’s ingenuity, but beef and chickens are always ready to be disguised as galantine, and thus find even readier consumers.
The garden adds to its June glories with broad beans (to peel or not to peel, that is the question), early runner beans, globe artichokes for Jerusalem, and last but by no means least, vegetable marrows. This much-maligned vegetable deserves better treatment, certainly not the white and vapid sauce that usually encloses it. What have our cows done that their butter should not enshrine it. We must see it, sharing some of that golden dew with runner beans, which without it lose what slight flavour they possess.
Currants, cherries and raspberries are now added to our fruit; and early apples to give the first taste of joys which will be with the luckier of us until next May – the Englishman’s fruit, just as beef is his meat.

I wonder if there is a rare typo here, ‘globe artichokes for Jerusalem,’ should it be ‘or Jerusalem,’?

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