Yesterday I wrote about Patna rice and Carolina rice, and in rather a silly mood said they sounded like a couple, Mr Patna and Mrs Caroline Rice; I mentioned that Patna rice came from India and was named after the city of Patna, and then in turn the rice gave its name to a village in Ayeshire Scotland.

Carolina rice comes from the Carolinas in the USA; the first grains were taken over in the early days of European settlement, and I’m not sure exactly what variety it is, except it is a long-grained rice. The recipe I shared yesterday used Carolina rice in the Pilaff of chicken from the National Mark Calendar of Cooking.  On the opposite page, the recipe for curried vegetables requires Patna rice and minced garlic which is described as ‘a great improvement!‘, and here it is:

Curried vegetables

  • 2 small onions, sliced
  • 1 tomato, quartered
  • a macedoine of vegetables (the recipe book suggests tinned, but it was written in the 1930’s before frozen foods were available – I’m sure it would have contained carrots and peas, and maybe other root vegetables)
  • 2 oz butter
  • garlic, minced
  • ½tsp curry powder (I’m sure our modern tastes would want more)
  • Patna rice
  • salt
  1. fry the onions and garlic in the butter
  2. add the curry powder and a pinch of salt, mix and stir well
  3. add the tomato and enough water to make a thick gravy
  4. while the saucce is cooking, boil the rice and strain
  5. add the vegetables to the sauce and heat through
  6. serve the sauce with the ‘dry boiled rice’

 

 

5 thoughts on “More about Mr and Mrs Rice

  1. Nothing like authentic subcontinent pilaff or curried vegetables, of course. Curry powder can be made according to taste and with different spices. It is best made and cooked, fresh. The only similarity might be the turmeric which gives it colour.

    Liked by 1 person

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