A nifty bit of footwork

‘ve mentioned I have a new project about to come to fruition – an anthology of work from two writing friends and me which, we hope, will soon be available!! Exciting!! It has been a busy year; in April I published ‘Earthquake’, my most recent Radwinter story (I’m working on the next which may arrive before Christmas, but is more likely to appear in January) and I also published my little writing guide ‘So You Want To Write’. As well as that this year I have been very involved with my writing groups, leading and being part of, and have had lots of exciting things in my own life, not least a six-week trip to Tasmania, and my daughter coming back to live at home after five years away!!

For some reason I thought I had also published a book which I first started writing about ten years ago or more, Lucky Portbraddon. However, that was just over a yea ago, September 2016! The idea for the Portbraddon story went back much further, had been in my mind for many years, and was inspired by – but definitely not based on, two strands of inspiration:

  • bands – having loved rock music just about all my life, and having seen at close quarters what it’s like to be in a band (my husband has been a drummer and in bands since he was about fourteen) I was fascinated by the dynamic in such groups. There is a closeness because of playing music together, rehearsing and live, and for some bands who go on the road sometimes for months at a time, there is an extra bond. However there are fall-outs and splits, and people leaving and new people arriving
  • family – I am so fortunate to be part of a great, loving and faithful family, and i must say here that the Portraddons are not remotely like my own cousins and are not based on them in any way except one – the one way that there is a similarity is the loyalty a family feel, a bond which can never be broken even if the family is broken. With my fictional Portbraddons there are major upheavals and betrayals, but even so at the end, as they constantly say ‘family is family’ and ‘family first’.

Here is an extract from Lucky Portbraddon. Ismene was the girlfriend and, she hope, fiancée to be, of one of the cousins. She went to meet the rest of the family and to spend Christmas with them in their grandma’s large but isolated  house up on the moors. They were snowed in for several days during which time Isméne’s boyfriend decided he didn’t love her and as soon as escape was possible he left to return to town.

In the following extract, Isméne has been brought home to her flat by a cousin, Nick; he is also giving a lift to his nephew, Noah, who is shy and awkward and always seems on the outside of everything. An unexpected reception awaits  Isméne.

They got out of Nick’s rickety car, stepping into slush. The night was damp and had a fusty town smell after the clear air up on the tops. The thaw had set in but there were still mounds of snow, semi-frozen piles of mush, speckled with dirty grey and black.
Noah stayed in the back and she waved at him through the side window; he managed a weak smile but looked away shiftily.
“You will stay in touch, won’t you Ismène?” Nick asked as she keyed in the code on the security pad.
“I sure will, as long as you want me to,” she held the door with her shoulder so he could come in with her bags.
He made a facetious response and she replied with a joke but she had the tiniest suspicion that Nick might want to do a little more than flirt. He was lovely but she had not the slightest interest in him even if she’d wanted another relationship.
Someone grabbed her and shoved her to the floor and a man jumped at Nick and began hitting him in the face. Nick was unable to defend himself, encumbered by her bags.
Ismène jumped up and grabbed the attacker’s arm, he spun round and it was Jaco.
“You leave her alone, you bastard, she’s my wife!” Jaco bellowed and shoved her aside to continue his attack on Nick.
Ismène tumbled backwards, falling over one of her bags, and sprawled across the floor again – And then there was a figure in black between Nick and Jaco. It was Noah and he grabbed Jaco, punched him straight in the face, before pushing him out of the door. He hurled him down the couple of steps then stood blocking the doorway.
“Fuck off shithead!” he bellowed.
Nick was on his knees, blood streaming through his fingers cupped over his face and Ismène tried to get him upright, appalled by the sudden violence.
“I’m so sorry, Nick, I’m really sorry.”
“What are you apologising for?” Nick staggered as if dizzy.
He called a muffled thank you to Noah, who cast a baleful look over his shoulder and went out, the door banging shut behind him.
Nick was wiping his arm on his sleeve, his moustache and beard a gory mess. The light in the hall was garish, Nick’s face was grey and he was certainly in pain. There were splashes of blood on the blue and green floor tiles, as if the seascape they showed had been the place of a dreadful battle.
“I didn’t realise he knew where I lived – I guess he thought you were James.”
She gathered her bags and other things, and hoping Noah was safe, she pushed Nick to the lift.  It pinged open and they hurried into its apple-scented interior.
“Long time since I’ve been in a fight,” Nick looked at himself in the mirror, touching his nose experimentally. “I don’t think it’s broken.”
“Well, it wasn’t really a fight. He hit you then Noah threw him out.”
“Oh, that’s right, spoil my moment of fantasy! In my mind I decked him with a quick one-two and some nifty footwork!”
As they stepped out of the lift Ismène’s neighbour was waiting; he cast a horrified look at Nick and hurried down the corridor to the stairs.

I hope you are intrigued and want to find out more! here is a link:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/LUCKY-PORTBRADDON-LOIS-ELSDEN-ebook/dp/B01LWTVURP/ref=sr_1_6?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1507879718&sr=1-6&keywords=lois+elsden

… and here are links to my other books I mentioned:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/EARTHQUAKE-RADWINTER-Book-LOIS-ELSDEN-ebook/dp/B06Y18H8JR/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1507879718&sr=1-4&keywords=lois+elsden

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Want-Write-Telling-Tales-Book-ebook/dp/B074W19JK3/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1507879718&sr=1-3&keywords=lois+elsden

The third woman

Today I’m sharing an excerpt from my most recently published Radwinter book, ‘Earthquake’. Thomas Radwinter has been consulted about a mystery – in 1931 thirteen Chinese girls were at a summer school, and several of them died in mysterious circumstances; at the time they were thought to be accidents, but Thomas has been asked to investigate by the son of one of the surviving girls.

In this excerpt, he is meeting Edward Foxley, the son of another ‘girl’ who died some twenty years later in 1952, drowned in a boating ‘accident’ with a school-friend, Cissie.

Edward Foxley was a very thin but quite handsome man; he had wire rimmed glasses which gave him an old fashioned appearance, and he reminded me a little of the politician Jacob Rees Mogg. I had my sensible, serious head on, and didn’t try and act dumb. I passed him details of the history of the old school, the photo of the girls and the school then and now. There was nothing personal about the girls, and no mention of their deaths.
“Your mother was very beautiful, sir,” I said as I handed him a larger copy of her photo. He nodded but said nothing and gazed at it… ‘Chinese crackers…
He looked again at the pictures of all the girls.
“Which one is Aunt Cissie? “
I pointed to her as she stared coolly and sadly out of the photo.
“Do you know how they died?” he asked.
I replied that I’d come across a newspaper report so yes, I did, and I offered my condolences for her passing sixty years ago.
“I have been to the place where she and Aunty Cissie died, I cannot imagine how it happened… The river is so slow, sluggish, how could two fit, not old women have died? It is shallow enough for them to have stood up… They both could swim, how did it happen!” he asked looking at me severely through his wire rimmed glasses. I felt a little uncomfortable, he reminded me of someone else who wore glasses who had done his best to kill me…
“Could you describe it to me, sir?”
He described the sluggish river, the water a greeny brown with a particular smell. There were meadows on either side, and when he was there the water was quite busy with punts and canoes. He’d walked there and then gone back and hired a punt, as his mother and Cissy had in 1953.
“I have thought about it a lot, Mr Radwinter. All the reports describe it as a tragic accident, but how? As I mentioned, mother was a good swimmer, a very good swimmer. She and my aunt went away on holiday together often, and they always went somewhere they could swim. Father and I would stay at home while they went off gallivanting…” He gave a little laugh. “That’s what father called it, I’d quite forgotten, gallivanting…” He drank his coffee.
I asked him if he knew anything about any of his mother’s school friends although he was very young when she died. He said nothing and I wondered whether he’d heard me and if I should repeat it.
Instead I said that I’d noticed in a couple of the newspaper reports of the accident a mention of a third person in the punt, another woman, but that it wasn’t referred to in the coroner’s report. I expected him to be suspicious of my interest – this wasn’t anything to do with writing a monograph on the Academy.
“Do you know who she is?” he asked eagerly… No I didn’t, I replied. I also didn’t say that if she existed, she may have been responsible for other deaths too.
There was something I didn’t like about him, I don’t know what, or why I felt like this.
“Was she one of my mother’s school friends? For some reason I always thought she might be…” and he lapsed into silence staring at his coffee. Now this was very interesting; he knew about the third woman, and he believed she’d been in the punt… So who could it be? I didn’t say anything to him but mentally ran through who was left, Frieda, Alma, Bertha or Frances…

© Lois Elsden 2017

If you want to find out whether these accidents were murder, and whether Thomas finds the answer to the eighty year-old mystery, then here is a link:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/EARTHQUAKE-RADWINTER-Book-LOIS-ELSDEN-ebook/dp/B06Y18H8JR/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1504942625&sr=8-2&keywords=lois+elsden

…and another link to my other e-books, and my recently published paperbacks:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=lois+elsden

Don’t confuse your reader!

As you can imagine, as well as doing a lot of writing (I’ve actually set myself a 800 word a day target for the next six weeks – not counting what I write here!) I do a lot of reading, and I do a lot reading about writing. It was a mixture of these things which, on the suggestion of my fellow blogger from my other blog, the Moving Dragon, that I had a look at a site which runs a ninety day challenge – to write eighty-five thousand words (yes 85,000)

The site which is called 85k90.com, has lots of interesting and helpful articles and I came across one which really rang a bell with my writing teaching – from when I was a teacher to now when I lead several writing groups. It’s all about not confusing your readers – and in actual fact they are the most simple and obvious points – simple and obvious but very easy to forget!

Here are the five by Wendy Janes:

  1. Ensure names and descriptions of characters are consistent
  2. Differentiate your characters
  3. Handle time carefully
  4. Yes, write beautiful prose, but don’t show off your vocabulary
  5. Steer clear of using drama for the sake of drama

Simple aren’t they? Because I’ve been writing just about all my life, from almost as soon as I could hold a pencil, I’ve learned these lessons by making mistakes on all these tips. Now I really try to make sure I don’t create muddle with names – however, in my genealogical mysteries, because my main character is dealing with family history sometimes there is a repeat of names – in my fiction as in real life family trees. I do that deliberately and carefully – and sometimes there is a muddle – but that is part of the story and I very clearly (I hope) make sure the reader knows it’s an intended muddle! I also write things down in old diaries to keep track of the dates of when things happen in my stories – I want events to be sequential and to be possible!

I guess my ultimate challenge in trying not to confuse the reader with characters was my latest Thomas Radwinter mystery, ‘Earthquake‘, where there were thirteen Chinese girls at a little boarding school in the 1930’s, one of them was murdered and the other twelve were all suspects! Twelve teenage girls!! I had to work really hard to make sure my readers didn’t get in a muddle (I got a bit in a muddle at times myself, I have to say!

When I read point number four, I almost blushed… with a little embarrassment. Last year I published my e-book ‘Lucky Portbraddon‘; it was something I had written quite a while ago but I wanted to get it off my mental writing shelf and out into the world. I set to editing it, having not looked at it for about seven years… oh dear… When I wrote it I had been trying to write a literary book… some of what I had written was actually very good, but it just felt unnatural and not my style, and well… pretentious to be honest! I went through with a mighty editing scythe and whipped out all the pompous, ‘aren’t I clever, aren’t I a wonderful writer‘ bits. I slimmed it down by more than a third cutting out ‘the beautiful prose’ which was just ‘showing off’ my vocabulary. It was a lesson learned, I can tell you!

Here is a link to the article which is very appropriately entitled, ‘Avoid Confusing Your Readers’!

https://85k90.com/five-simple-editing-tips/

… and here is a link to the challenge site:

https://85k90.com/

…and here is a link to my slimmed down ‘Lucky Portbraddon’:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/LUCKY-PORTBRADDON-LOIS-ELSDEN-ebook/dp/B01LWTVURP/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1502443608&sr=8-3&keywords=lois+elsden

… and my twelve suspect 1930’s murder mystery:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/EARTHQUAKE-RADWINTER-Book-LOIS-ELSDEN-ebook/dp/B06Y18H8JR/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1502444271&sr=8-2&keywords=lois+elsden

… and here is a link to our other Moving Dragon blog:

https://somersetwriters.wordpress.com

So many words a day

One of my favourite writers posts a daily word count on Twitter… I wonder if he has a target or  if he is just keeping track… Maybe I should ask him.

I don’t keep track of how many words I write, I just write! if I did keep track, would I also count the words I write here, or only the words I write for whatever story I am working on? At present I am writing the next Thomas Radwinter story, provisionally called ‘Saltpans’ and I don’t have a finish date in mind either. I think it should be finished in the first draft by halfway through September – I had hoped for the end of august, but no, other things have interfered. When there is no-one else involved like an editor or agent or publisher, there is only me to keep cracking the whip. Maybe best-selling writers have people to clean their houses, do the washing and ironing, take care of the garden, go shopping… well, I just have me and my husband. I’m not complaining, I’m fine with it, but that’s the way it is!

Going back to word count; the only time I do keep track of my words is November, the National Novel Writing Month, a thirty-day challenge to write a new novel. Does it help me, is it something I should adopt? Well it is actually quite stressful, especially if unavoidable things happen, like visitors, or days out or weekends away, but I do manage to maintain that 1,700 or so words a day for those thirty days… Well, I have for the last four years, but could I maintain it for more than thirty days… I am sure I could not. So would I be able to sustain a lower target, say a thousand words a day? Maybe – but how would I take account of the work I do re-writing, researching, writing background or support material which won’t go into the actual story?

Maybe instead of setting a target I should just keep track of my story word count – just so I know what progress I’m making… Maybe I will do that. Maybe I’ll start that today and report back next week, next Monday – no next Tuesday afternoon!

In the meantime, here are links to the books I started for the national Novel Writing Month, and finished and published:

2013 – Radwinter – published 2014:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/RADWINTER-Lois-Elsden-ebook/dp/B00IFG1SNO/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1502118569&sr=8-1&keywords=LOIS+ELSDEN

2014 – Raddy and Syl – published 2015:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/RADDY-SYL-RADWINTER-Book-3-ebook/dp/B00WAN0YD8/ref=sr_1_12?ie=UTF8&qid=1502118569&sr=8-12&keywords=LOIS+ELSDEN

2015 – Earthquake – published 2017:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/EARTHQUAKE-RADWINTER-Book-LOIS-ELSDEN-ebook/dp/B06Y18H8JR/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1502118569&sr=8-2&keywords=LOIS+ELSDEN

2016 – And the River – to be published (2018/19)

 

My name is Shsh Shshsher…

With all the excitement of the launch of my first paperback, which is also the first story of my Radwinter series, I have been a little neglectful of the most recent e-book which I published at the beginning of April this year. That book was the latest in the series, and is called ‘Earthquake‘. My main character Thomas Radwinter conducts several investigations during the course of the novel, one of which is for a new client… in this extract, the new client rings him up:

Even so, mornings are hectic, and the priority is to get Kylie to work and Kenneil to school and then the little ones and I can sort out my work. So it was today, a proper paid work day today, and the twins were at the nursery, Cassie was with her cousins, John’s children, Julia and Janek, and I settled down to make the most of my day and earn some money.
I have to be very strict with myself, which is much more difficult than you might think, because particularly when I’m doing someone’s family tree I get terribly side-tracked by interesting names and strange occupations. I have such a busy life, housework, cooking, washing, shopping, John’s allotment, looking after our garden, taking Cassie and Kenneil swimming, seeing my brothers and their families…
So I was concentrating completely on the ins and outs of some legal papers for a client and didn’t register my phone was ringing. I answered it rather more loudly than I meant to and there was silence then the sound of laboured breathing…
Good grief, don’t say I’ve got a heavy-breather… Hello? I said rather firmly and sternly ready to finish the call and block the number.
“Good morning… is that Mr. Radwinter….” And the voice, man or woman I couldn’t tell, faded away, then started again. “My name is Shsh Shshsher…”
“I’m sorry, you are?”
“Shsh Shshsher… A friend at the golf club suggested you might be able to help me…”
When I was working as a proper solicitor in a practice in Strand, I had a dear old gentleman who always asked for me to assist in his matters and business, usually changing his will which was a bit of a hobby of his. When our firm amalgamated with another and moved their head office to Castair, I was effectively given the sack; however my kindly old gentleman insisted I continue to handle his affairs and more than that, recommended me to a lot of his friends at the golf club. The golf club gang, as I call them, are my best clients, and are nearly all nice people and also quite wealthy.
As well as the usual conveyancing, enduring powers of attorney, wills and even a couple of divorces, they have asked me to help them on several intriguing ‘investigations’ as I mentioned above, the missing woman, the Moroccan and the Tibetan Lama.
“I will try my best Mr. Shshsher…” I couldn’t ask him again for his name, having tried to work it out three times. “Perhaps we could arrange a time where we could meet, or maybe I could call on you… what sort of business do you wish to conduct?”
There was another yawning pause before Mr. Shshsher replied that he would have to discuss that with me…  He wasn’t sure I could help, he wasn’t sure anyone could help, but his friends had recommended me highly…
He gave me his address, a place I didn’t know over on the other side of Strand, and we agreed I should call the next day at eleven.

If you want to know what the mysterious assignment is, and whether Thomas manages to undertake it successfully, here is a link to ‘Earthquake’:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/EARTHQUAKE-RADWINTER-Book-LOIS-ELSDEN-ebook/dp/B06Y18H8JR/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1501356444&sr=8-2&keywords=lois+elsden

and in case you haven’t yet got a copy of my paperback, Radwinter, here is a link for you:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/RADWINTER-Lois-Elsden-x/dp/1521415196/ref=sr_1_1_twi_pap_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1501356444&sr=8-1&keywords=lois+elsden

The Ramseys were all sailors, mariners, fishermen…

In my next Thomas Radwinter book, which maybe called Saltpans, Thomas begins to investigate his wife’s family history… here is a sneak preview…

Kylie’s family, the Ramseys were all sailors, mariners, fishermen… occasionally one was a master mariner, or joined the navy and moved away, some sons went off to work in the brick factories,   the daughters were in service or worked in shops or milliners, their work may have been ordinary but they always worked, census after census that I went through there they were, grafting… Kylie has it in her blood because she never stops working either! I went through the local work house records and didn’t find a single Ramsey; when I was researching the Radwinters they had impoverished lives from time to time and had to apply for poor relief, or actually ended up in the work house… grim times…
Patrick Ramsey married Marie Lesesne Finch in 1930,… and I drew a blank. Plenty of Finches, loads of them but I couldn’t find a Marie Finch who married Patrick Ramsey… This happens; you have to get used to the apparently most simple search being confounded. Patrick Ramsey married Marie Finch in 1930, that I do know here it is, and she died in 1995, aged 90, here is her death certificate, and it says she was born in Yarmouth – not Yarmouth on the isle of Wight which we visited a couple of years ago, but Great Yarmouth in Norfolk on the East coast.  However, I’m blowed if I can find her birth… I have a little ponder, and then look her up on the 1911 census; she’s not there either unless her birth date is wrong.
There are ten Marie Finches, one is only a year old, so I guess our Marie could have been born in 1910 not 1905, but why would there be a mistake like that… Hmmm… Well her unusual middle name Lesesne makes me think that it might have been her mother’s maiden name so I look up a Miss Lesesne (or maybe Mademoiselle Lesesne) marrying a Mr. Finch…
…and here she is Marie Lesesne married Anatole Finch. Here he is Anatole Finch… what a name… surely another French name?  Anatole Finch was Marie’s husband not her father, her first husband, and he died in  1929… Poor Marie… I’ll explore Anatole some other time, because he isn’t actually related to us, but I’ll go back and look at Marie Lesesne and find her family; that should be easy, she was born in Yarmouth and I should be able to find her now I know her birth name wasn’t Finch, that was her first married name…
Except she still doesn’t appear in the births… well maybe she was called something else, when she was born, Mary or May or Margaret not Marie, and I do find a couple of children, Marguerite and Madeleine, in the births, but they don’t appear in the 1911 census… although Marri Lesesne does! Good grief! Why didn’t I just check her in the census straight away! And there she is in Norfolk, born in great Yarmouth she would be in Norfolk, aged six, but wait a bit, she’s not with her family… what? I can’t make this out.
She’s on her own in 1911, she’s only six and she seems to be in some sort of institution! I’ve found Marie, among a load of other people, mainly adults, although there are a few children, but what is amazing, they are nearly all French!
Here it says that Marie is French and she was born in Menton, not Great Yarmouth! However that’s near where she was living in 1911, living in Norfolk! I look up Menton which it turns out is on the Mediterranean, right next to Italy and not far from Monaco.
I have a quick look on Wikipedia and skip through the history of the little town, nick-named the Pearl of France. Apparently its name was first noted in 1262 and then was ruled by the princes of Monaco, and how wonderful! – It ceded from Monaco in revolt against a lemon tax! A tax on lemons, good grief! And one little town breaks away from its rulers! A lemon tax! I tell Kylie, and she pokes me in the ribs and says, honestly, Thomas!

© Lois Elsden 2017

All the details here are a total fiction, I have made every one of them up; if by some coincidence these names and dates seem to relate to real people, please tell me – it’s an absolute accident and I will change it right away!

If you haven’t yet caught up with my Radwinter genealogical mysteries, here’s a link:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/RADWINTER-5-Book-Series/dp/B072HTG366/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1499777022&sr=8-9&keywords=lois+elsden

When nothing happens

Like many people I’m on Linkedin (which for a quite a while, for no reason, I thought was called Lindlekin ) I rarely use it at all but occasionally I get notifications and today it was from a writing group, and it was a question “When nothing happens – Do you like stories that have ambiguous endings or stories in which not much happens? For example, instead of being plot-driven, a story can be character-driven?”

Now that’s a very good question! I actually don’t like stories where nothing much happens… I’ve written before about my reading habits, and how I think in some ways I am not as good a reader as I used to be – although recently I’ve had string of successful ‘reads’, so maybe I’m improving! I used to be able to wade through anything and persevere to the end… now ‘when nothing happens‘ I tend to give up! A friend in our reading group loves beautifully written books, loves the language of them… but I’m afraid I want some story line, I want some sort of action! I don’t mean that there has to be a punch up on every page or a chase or a romantic development, but I want to feel as if there is some sort of progression.

It’s the same in my writing, I like to have some sort of progression, people change, relationships begin or end, events occur – unexpected, unlooked-for, sometimes unwanted! I guess I like plots! Characters are everything, and setting, but there must be a plot… and endings… satisfactory endings are vital! A satisfactory ending is not necessarily a closed, completed ending, it can be open or ambiguous – but it must conclude the proceedings! I have a very good friend who very kindly tells me honestly what she thinks of my stories, and I always take great heed of her suggestions and advice; on one occasion she commented that an ending (of Flipside) was too brief – everything was wrapped up and concluded too hastily and although the mystery was solved, the characters were left sort of hanging about! So in the next book I worked very hard on the ending – and I’m delighted to say she approved!

Just to briefly look at the endings of my novels…

  • Farholm – the puzzle is solved, the mystery revealed, but for the characters there will continue to be difficulties after the conclusion – grieving will continue, an unhappy relationship struggles on, and another relationship will never even start
  • The Stalking of Rosa Czekov – the stalker is revealed, but  a new relationship based on a rather precarious foundation begins on almost the last page
  • Loving Judah – a resolved ending, but I hope I have pointed the reader towards realising there will be a rocky road ahead for two of the characters
  • The Double Act – a complete conclusion – but when I came to do the final edit, I had to add an extra bit – an epilogue I guess you could call it. The dramatic action had ended in a flourish, but the reader needed a come-down, so I added a final piece when the two main characters are visited by the investigating police officer some months later; readers can imagine an optimistic onward journey, I hope
  • night vision – all the secrets are revealed, and the main character is overwhelmed with happiness and relief, but I hope the reader will see that in actual fact, her optimism might be misguided
  • Lucky Portbraddon – for some of the Portbraddon family, their lives seem settled and hopeful at the end of the book; for others there are unresolved issues, but I hope it is a satisfactory ending since the characters all seem in a position to deal with an unsettled future
  • The Radwinter stories – the first novel, Radwinter, was supposed to be a stand-alone story with a complete conclusion and a short epilogue to pull everything together; it could have remained like that but I realised only half the story was told, and so a sequel appeared… and then it seemed somehow a series emerged. I hope each one is also stand-alone, and I try to tie up the different narrative strands satisfactorily

So to answer the original question – I don’t like books where nothing happens, I don’t mind an ambiguous ending, but it must be a satisfactory ending!

Here is a link to my books:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=lois+elsden